June 28, 2017

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Articles Published in: January 2014

FHA Loan Occupancy Rules: A Reader Question

A reader asks, “With a FHA Arm 5/1 or Section 251 loan, how long do I have to live in the house before I can sell it?” This may seem like a tricky question. FHA loan rules for single family home loans found in HUD 4155.1 do list occupancy requirements. According to Chapter Four: “At least one borrower must occupy the property and sign the security instrument and the mortgage note in order for the property to be considered owner-occupied. FHA security instruments require a borrower to establish bona fide occupancy in a home as the borrower

 

FHA Loans, Credit Reports, And Identity Theft

One of the most oft-repeated bits of advice related to FHA home loans or refinance loans is that it’s best to start early–at least a year in advance–when planning for an FHA loan application. One of the reasons to start early involves the length of time it can take to check your credit report to learn your credit score and to make sure there’s no erroneous data or evidence of identity fraud on your report. With recent headlines about credit card data being stolen from major retailers, this advice couldn’t be more helpful. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is urging customers of “big box” retailers recently in the news for data breaches and hacking problems to check their credit card activity and credit reports for signs of fraud or | more...

 

FHA Loan Refinancing: What You Should Know

If you’re interested in refinancing your home loan with an FHA loan but have never explored your refinancing loan options before, there are a few things you should know about the FHA refinancing loan program that can help you make the best choices for your needs and wants. The rules which govern FHA loan refinancing are found in HUD 4155.1, Chapter Three (and elsewhere). In this portion of the FHA loan rulebook. we learn that FHA refinancing loans include the following: streamline refinances of existing FHA-insured mortgages made with or without appraisals no cash out refinances (rate and term) of conventional and FHA-insured mortgages, where all proceeds are used to pay existing liens and costs associated with the transactions cash out refinances How long a term is an FHA loan | more...

 

FHA No-Cash Out Refinancing Loans (With Appraisal): Basic Rules

There are plenty of reasons to refinance a home with an FHA no-cash-out refinancing loan–taking advantage of lower interest rates is one of those good reasons, as is getting into a lower mortgage payment. The FHA offers a variety of refinancing options for single family home loans–what are the basic ground rules for an FHA no-cash-out refinancing loan? For starters, the amount that can be refinanced is, according to HUD 4155.1 Chapter Three Section B, “is the lesser of the 97.75% Loan-To-Value (LTV) factor applied to the appraised value of the property, or existing debt. The total FHA first mortgage is limited to 100% of the appraised value, including any financed upfront mortgage insurance premium (UFMIP).” Chapter Three adds that in general, the maximum mortgage cannot exceed the “statutory limit, | more...

 

FHA Loan Rules: Non-Occupying Co-Borrower Requirements

In a recent blog post we discussed the rules for FHA loans where a non-occupying co-borrower was involved. The scenario we discussed specifically was a parent buying a home with a child (FHA loan rules permit this under the right circumstances), but in general there are FHA mortgage loan rules that apply whenever a non-occupying co-borrower is present. In general, unless the non-occupying co-borrower is a family member, FHA loan rules in HUD 4155.1 say, “When there are two or more borrowers, but one or more will not occupy the property as his/her principal residence, the maximum mortgage is limited to 75% loan-to-value (LTV).” The rules provide an exception to that restriction when the co-borrower is: “related by blood, marriage, or law, such as − spouses − parents-children − siblings | more...

 

FHA Loan Answers: Can A Parent Buy A Home With A Child Using An FHA Loan?

Lots of parents want to help their children get a leg up in the early stages of adult life. Some parents pay for their children to go to college, some buy cars, and still others buy homes for their children. Can a parent and child apply for an FHA mortgage together even if the parent doesn’t plan on living in the home? FHA loan rules found in HUD 4155.1 explain what is possible and what is not possible for an FHA loan when it comes to applications with “non-occupying co-borrowers”. In such cases, Chapter Two Section B of HUD 4155.1 says, “A non-occupying borrower transaction involves two or more borrowers where one or more of the borrower(s) will not occupy the property as his/her primary residence. When there are two | more...

 

Can FHA Home Loan Closing Costs Be Financed? A Reader Question

A reader asks, “I have read in several places on the web that it is possible to finance your closing costs into a FHA loan. However, many of these sources are at least a couple of years old. Is this possible?” To start, let’s examine what the FHA official site has to say about FHA loans and closing costs. At www.HUD.gov on the page titled Let FHA Loans Help You, we find the following: “FHA might be just what you need. Your down payment can be as low as 3.5% of the purchase price, and most of your closing costs and fees can be included in the loan. Available on 1-4 unit properties.” Some closing costs may be financed, some may be paid by the seller within the boundaries of | more...

 

FHA Loan Reader Questions: Employment Requirements

A reader asks, “Can a borrower get a FHA loan with less than two years of employment? She has a full time and part time job. However she has only been employed for 6 months on each job.” Let’s examine what FHA loan rules say about this subject. FHA requirements for employment verification are found in HUD 4155.1. In Chapter One, Section B we learn: “The lender is required to verify the applicant

 

FHA Loan Reader Questions: Trouble With The Home Purchased With an FHA Mortgage Loan

A reader asks, “My granddaughter purchased a home with an FHA mortgage, which has some serious physical problems. Can you give me the address of someone or some department, to which she can address these problems?” Borrowers with FHA loan issues should contact the FHA directly by calling 1-800 CALL FHA. In situations like these, there are some important considerations to keep in mind. As we address these issues, we should point out that we don’t know in this particular case whether the borrower did or did not take the steps we recommend below. All we know is what’s in the reader question printed above and our advice shouldn’t be taken to imply the reader did or did not take said advice–we mention these things for the benefit of anyone | more...