June 24, 2017

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Articles Tagged With: FHA Loan Rules

HUD: June Is National Healthy Homes Month

The Department of Housing and Urban Development has announced the second-annual National Healthy Homes Month. According to a press release at the FHA/HUD official site, “Launched by HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes (OLHCHH), National Healthy Homes Month 2017 will focus national attention on ways to keep people of all ages safe and healthy in their homes.” That focus includes an emphasis on lead paint. According to the HUD official site, National Healthy Homes Month is themed, “Just What the Doctor Ordered,” and put the spotlight on “the vital role that pediatricians and the health community play in healthy homes education” The HUD press release observes that due to lead poisoning and other home-connected health risks, creating a healthier home environment should be a top priority. “National | more...

 

FHA Appraisal Problems: A Reader Question

A reader asks, “I had an FHA appraisal and that came down said everything was in good working order, inspection on roof and all windows. Everything said it was old but good. Bought the house, got $5,000 off for repairs but turns out all windows need to be replaced. Roof needs to be replaced, central air unit needs to be replaced (which was done). But windows are all broken, don’t work and roof is leaking, all plywood needs to be replaced…is there anything we can do or is this all on us?” The implication of this reader question is that the reader did not pay for the optional (but critically important) home inspection. We can’t speculate on what actually happened, but all borrowers should know that it is stated FHA/HUD | more...

 

FHA Loans And Multi-Unit Properties

FHA home loans are intended for owner-occupiers. The FHA loan occupancy requirement states that the borrower must begin using the home purchased with an FHA loan within a specified time after closing (usually within 60 days) and for a minimum of one year. But FHA loan rules also permit owner-occupiers to buy multi-unit properties. For multi-unit homes, the borrower must occupy at least one unit but is free to rent out the unused spaces in the home to others. FHA loan rules limit the number of units to four in these transactions. If a borrower intends to apply for an FHA loan for a home that has multiple units, it may be tempting to try to convince the lender to factor in any potential income from such rental as part | more...

 

HUD Announces Settlement In California Fair Housing Case

The Department of Housing and Urban Development has announced a settlement in a California Fair Housing Act discrimination case. According to the FHA/HUD official site, HUD “reached an agreement with the owner and manager of a California apartment complex, resolving allegations they discriminated against tenants because of their national origin and familial status. Two related complaints filed with HUD alleged that the manager of the Four Palms Apartments in Mountain View, California, made discriminatory statements about Latino residents and prohibited their children from playing outside”. Such discrimination is not permitted under federal Fair Housing Act laws. “A family’s right to enjoy their home shouldn’t depend on where they are from or whether they have children,” said Bryan Greene, HUD’s General Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, who | more...

 

After The FHA Loan Closes: FHA Loan Reader Questions

A reader got in touch recently to ask an FHA loan question about the disposition of the property once the loan has closed. “After receiving the loan, are there any regulations on putting two other mobile homes on the property? They will not be on a permanent foundation. We are currently buying 15 acres of land in Texas.” FHA loan rules are clear about the status of a mobile or manufactured home that is purchased with an FHA mortgage loan-all such property types must meet FHA minimum standards and be affixed to a permanent foundation as a condition of loan approval. However, the FHA Single Family Loan Handbook, HUD 4000.1, does not address the condition of add-ons, improvements, or other modifications that happen after the loan has closed. A borrower | more...

 

FHA Appraisal Problems: A Reader Question

We’ve gotten a variety of questions in our comments section this week about issues connected to the FHA appraisal process. Here’s the latest: “I have an FHA loan. It started raining on the day of the appraisal and we noticed a leak in the basement. The sellers agreed to fix the drainage issue that was causing it. During the walk-through we noticed that instead of busting out concrete and installing drainage pipes that they patched it up with more concrete. As ugly as it was I was okay with it as long as it kept the basement dry.” “Fast Forward to the first rainy day after closing on the home and I have an all out flood in my basement! My realtor said that there is nothing that can be | more...

 

FHA Loan Appraisal Questions: Well Water Guidelines

A reader asked us an FHA loan appraisal question this week about a recent post we did on water quality issues. “We have been requiring a safe water test to verify the water standards are meet per the guidelines but we now have an Loan Officer arguing that it is not required unless the appraiser notes an issue. Is a water test really not required have I been reading the guidelines wrong since 2015?” The “we” in this case would seem to be a participating FHA lender. Is the loan officer mentioned in the question correct? We turned to the relevant passages in HUD 4000.1 to reaffirm what the FHA loan rule book says about water quality. “The Mortgagee must confirm that a connection is made to a public or | more...

 

FHA Appraisal Questions: Defective Conditions

A reader asks a question about FHA appraisal issues: “Bought a house that was supposedly totally renovated about a 1.5 months ago. Finding out about major issues and violations in the house. There were a lot of concealed things hidden…found they had unlicensed contractors.” “Didn’t have the money to do a regular home inspection. People were saying FHA does their own home inspection to make sure house is safe…problems with windows plumbing illegal hookup with water main electrical box etc. Have to make a payment to mortgage plus fighting with seller to get licensed contractors…please tell me why didn’t FHA see these issues.” FHA appraisals must never be confused with a home inspection. The FHA and HUD warn borrowers of this in a document found on the FHA/HUD official site | more...

 

FHA Loan Application Data: What You Should Know

The FHA single family loan program rule book, HUD 4000.1, has a variety of rules and instructions to the lender on how FHA loan application information is to be handled and processed. You might not think those rules affect you as an applicant, but some of the rules do pertain to how the lender must collect the borrower’s information and the approved sources of that information. Your credit scores and other data must be given to the lender from approved sources. Did you know that HUD 4000.1 does not permit the borrower to handle or transmit certain kinds of information to the lender? Your loan officer is responsible for making sure she gets the information from the proper sourcing. According to HUD 4000.1: “Mortgagees must not accept or use documents | more...

 

FHA Appraisal Questions: Peeling Paint, Electrical Outlets

We frequently get FHA appraisal questions in our comments sections. Here’s one of the latest: “Im trying to purchase a home and I have an FHA loan. The only thing Im concerned about is the peeling paint outside and that some of the outlets arent grounded. How would this affect my FHA loan approval?” FHA appraisal rules are found in HUD 4000.1. The instructions to the FHA appraiser don’t cover all possible contingencies for defective conditions, required corrections, etc. but do have something to say about peeling paint. The age of the paint may determine the extent of the corrections/repairs in this area. According to HUD 4000.1, for homes or improvements on or before 1978: “The Appraiser must note the condition and location of all defective paint and require repair | more...