October 16, 2019

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Articles Tagged With: Co-borrower

FHA Home Loan Approval Questions

FHA Home Loan Approval Questions Part One

FHA home loan approval is a process that requires your lender to review your credit history, employment history, and many other factors before deciding to approve or deny a home loan application. There are many questions about this process, and the more answers you have before yo start filling out applications, the better. The answers in this blog post pertain to FHA loan basics, but also rules for self-employed borrowers and those earning commission income. FHA Loan Approval Basics: What Do I Need To Know? The lender will pull copies of your credit report and review your payment history for the 12 months leading up to the mortgage loan application. FHA loan rules are similar to other home loan requirements in this area; coming to your FHA mortgage application process | more...

 
Top Tips For FHA One-Time Close Mortgages

FHA Home Loans With Non-Occupying Co-Borrowers

Do FHA home loans have rules for transactions with non-occupying co-borrower? The short answer is yes, there are considerations for FHA mortgage loans that feature one or more borrowers who will occupy the property, but also a borrower who will not. These rules are found in HUD 4000.1 and include requirements for the basic transaction-at least one borrower MUST occupy the home to be purchased with an FHA mortgage as a condition of loan approval. This is normally supposed to happen within 60 days of loan closing according to FHA loan rules. Lender standards may also apply. FHA loan rules have some basic requirements for co-borrowers who will not occupy the home, including the following from HUD 4000.1: “To be eligible, all occupying and non-occupying Borrowers and co-Borrowers must take | more...

 

Cosigners and Co-Borrowers On FHA Loans

In our previous blog post we discussed an FHA loan reader question about co-borrowers and their status. What is the basic difference between a cosigner and a co-borrower and how does an FHA loan work in such cases? FHA loan rules in HUD 4000.1 differentiate between a cosigner and co-borrower; the cosigner, while liable for the loan, does not have any ownership in the property. The co-borrower has both financial responsibility and ownership. Both cosigners and co-borrowers must have a legal primary residence in the United States or be U.S. citizens. Borrowers, co-borrowers, and cosigners all must provide basic information to the lender including Social Security numbers. Co-borrowers and cosigners are subject to the rules of HUD 4000.1 that restrict who can participate in an FHA loan transaction: “A party | more...

 

FHA Loans With A Non-Occupying Co-Borrower

How does having a non-occupying co-borrower affect your FHA mortgage? What happens if one of the borrowers decides they want a change in their status as occupying or non-occupying? A reader asked us a question along these lines recently in the comments section: “I just purchased my home in November 2016 with my husband’s uncle as a co-borrower (not living in the property). Now he is getting a divorce and his soon-to-be ex-wife wants the househe basically just helped me qualify of put the down payment to purchase and pay the mortgage on my ownhe even signed hes rights to the title the day we signed for the property is I was told. I could put in that paper after about 6 months of having the property but now I | more...

 

FHA Loan Co-Signers & Co-Borrowers

A reader asked us a question this week in the comments section about FHA loan co-signer and/or co-borrower rules. “If there is more than one person on the loan application, does it matter what percentage each person owns?” There are a number of variables that need to be addressed to properly answer this question. For example, does the reader refer to a co-signer, or a co-borrower? Are the applicants legally married? If so, do they reside in a community property state? FHA loan co-signer rules in HUD 4000.1 don’t specify a percentage of ownership for co-signers. The rules simply state the co-signer is “liable for the debt”. FHA loan rules for eligibility of co-borrowers (occupying and non-occupying) don’t mention a percentage of ownership, either: “To be eligible, all occupying and | more...

 
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FHA Loan Questions: Co-Borrowers

A reader asks, “My husband is a co burrower on his mothers mortgage loan and he has been asking her to remove his name from it but she hasnt. The mortgage has affected his credit and has made it hard to get a home of our own. Can his name be removed from the mortgage or is this something we need a lawyer for?” Before answering this question, let’s examine how the FHA defines the role of a co-borrower. Page 128 of HUD 4000.1 states: “To be eligible, all occupying and non-occupying Borrowers and co-Borrowers must take title to the Property in their own name or a Living Trust at settlement, be obligated on the Note or credit instrument, and sign all security instruments. In community property states, the Borrowers | more...

 

FHA Loan Amounts for Loans With Non-Occupying Co-Borrowers

FHA loans permit a buyer to apply for the mortgage with a non-occupying co-borrower, which is defined as someone financially obligated on the mortgage and required to sign all legal paperwork to that effect, but who is not living on the property purchased with the FHA loan as their principal residence. In these cases, FHA rules state that the loan amount is limited to a 75% LTV, which means the borrowers must provide the remaining 25% of the purchase price. Some borrowers may read that feeling defeated before they start if that remaining 25% is too much to come up with, but FHA loan applicants should keep in mind an exception on this 75% LTV requirement for non-occupying co-borrowers who are also related to the occupying borrower. Specifically, FHA requirements | more...